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Dimmu Borgir - Spiritual Black Dimensions album download

Complete your Dimmu Borgir collection. Quite a disappointing re-release from Nuclear Blast.

Dimmu Borgir - Spiritual Black Dimensions (1999).

Spiritual Black Dimensions, for me, is Dimmu Borgir's best album. It may not contain my favourite tracks ('Puritania' and 'Progenies of the Great Apocalypse' take the prize there) but it contains Dimmu's most consistently well written songs contained on one release. The bombastic power of 'The Insight & the Cartharsis' shows most symphonic black metal bands how to do it properly, while the steamrolling 'Behind the Curtains of Night: Phantasmagoria' displays the more black metal edge; less drama and more buzzsaw riffing. KPKing - 30 Januar 2009: Sure. Dimmu Borgir is still excelent Black Metal. And if someone say : "this or that is mainstream and this is not ", then maybe it´s only about good and bad music.

Spiritual Black Dimensions is the fourth studio album by Norwegian black metal band Dimmu Borgir. It was released in 1999 by Nuclear Blast Records. This release featured keyboardist Mustis and the clean vocals of ICS Vortex, as well as the departure of long-time drummer Tjodalv, guitarist Astennu, and bassist Nagash. The music’s overall feel is faster and darker with more emphasis on the keyboard lines versus the slower, more riff-heavy approach of previous albums. The band attributes this to Astennu’s due influence, as his Carpe Tenebrum project at the time had a very similar musical direction. This album also marked a first in Dimmu’s run to feature the clean vocals of ICS Vortex, adding a new dimension to the Dimmu sound. The band continued to use the contrasting vocals in future albums. The album cover was part of the top 10 of Greatest Heavy Metal Album Covers by Blender magazine.

Spiritual Black Dimensions. According to an interview with Warthog (a Norwegian metal zine), the band originally wanted Carl McCoy to perform the clean vocals parts on the album but this didn't work out due to time restraints. Recording information: Recorded and mixed between August and October 1998 at the Abyss Studio.

Spiritual Black Dimensions’ longest song and probably their most epic song before their more orchestral days during the following two albums. Grotesquery Conceiled not only has its title spelt wrong, but has some of the band’s best soloing. That aside, it isn’t anything special.

Borknagar vocalist Simon makes a guest appearance.

Track List

Title/Composer Performer Time
1 Reptile Dimmu Borgir / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 5:17
2 Behind the Curtains of Night - Phantasmagoria Dimmu Borgir / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 3:21
3 Dreamside Dominions Dimmu Borgir / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 5:14
4 United in Unhallowed Grace Dimmu Borgir Dimmu Borgir 4:22
5 The Promised Future Aeons Dimmu Borgir Dimmu Borgir 6:52
6 The Blazing Monoliths of Defiance Dimmu Borgir Dimmu Borgir 4:38
7 The Insight and the Catharsis Dimmu Borgir / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 7:17
8 Grotesquery Conceiled Dimmu Borgir / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 5:10
9 Arcane Lifeforce Mysteria Dimmu Borgir / Shagrath / Erkekjetter Silenoz Dimmu Borgir 7:03

Dimmu Borgir - Spiritual Black Dimensions album download

Performer: Dimmu Borgir

Title: Spiritual Black Dimensions

Recording date: August, 1998 - October, 1998

Duration: 49:14

Style: Black Metal,Heavy Metal,Scandinavian Metal

Recording location: Abyss Studios, Sweden

Genre: Rock/Pop

Size MP3: 1857 mb

Size FLAC: 1682 mb

Rating: 4.5 / 5

Votes: 257

Other Formats: XM MP3 APE AUD TTA MP1

Related Music Albums

Laizel
Enthrone Darkness Triumphant was the turning point for Dimmu Borgir’s career, but it had still a grainy and extreme-tending production: Spiritual Black Dimensions, by comparisons, finds the band incorporating the famous Progressive Rock dynamics of Cradle of Filth and the D tuning, explaining in this way the proverbial comparison between the two bands. In other words, this isn’t the same intimal band isolated from the rest of the world who released For All Tid: this is a band of businessmen ready to take the world by storm. The production is a constant blast of high frequencies, ultra-loud volumes, horror-vacui arrangements and a constant triumph of excess, glory, victory and defeat over the mediocre. Unlike Watain, however, the songs here are inspired and feature driving leads and progressions, despite sharing the same Thrash Metal-tending melodies.“Reptile” is a bomb of an opener, but in general, pretty much most of the album evokes moments of naughtiness and excess of everything. Stop-start dynamics, relentless hyper-speed power-chording, energetic drumming and evocative keyboard sounds (witness the grand piano and magnificent choruses at the start of the epic “The Promised Future Aeons”): there may not be a trace of Classical/Symphonic Music (more like film soundtracks), but the songs are so carefully arranged that this album doesn’t even seem released just two years after Enthrone Darkness Triumphant. Silenoz and Astennu (who left the band after this album’s recording) use powerful guitar tones, and on a pair of occasions there’s the occasional Neoclassical guitar scale.In theory, this collection of instrumental duels and strong arrangements should be flawless: instead, it really isn’t. Although at the time the label hadn’t yet reached the relevance of the 00’s, Nuclear Blast’s modus operandi of ultra-clear, ultra-loud production technique (here a bit hampered by the analogic recording) had dictated their way even on Spiritual Black Dimension. The album isn’t bad, but with such a pumped production and overkill of dynamics, it’s hard to choose highlights and even to distinguish melodies and songs. And although if Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth managed to perpetuate successfully the continuation of Emperor’s style, both became also targets of genre fanatics obsessed with “purity” and “underground community”. In other words, those who may feel offended by the exaggerated theatrics of this album will hardly continue on with the band’s discography.Highlights: “Reptile”, “The Promised Future Aeons”, "Arcane Lifeforce Mysteria".
Laizel
Enthrone Darkness Triumphant was the turning point for Dimmu Borgir’s career, but it had still a grainy and extreme-tending production: Spiritual Black Dimensions, by comparisons, finds the band incorporating the famous Progressive Rock dynamics of Cradle of Filth and the D tuning, explaining in this way the proverbial comparison between the two bands. In other words, this isn’t the same intimal band isolated from the rest of the world who released For All Tid: this is a band of businessmen ready to take the world by storm. The production is a constant blast of high frequencies, ultra-loud volumes, horror-vacui arrangements and a constant triumph of excess, glory, victory and defeat over the mediocre. Unlike Watain, however, the songs here are inspired and feature driving leads and progressions, despite sharing the same Thrash Metal-tending melodies.“Reptile” is a bomb of an opener, but in general, pretty much most of the album evokes moments of naughtiness and excess of everything. Stop-start dynamics, relentless hyper-speed power-chording, energetic drumming and evocative keyboard sounds (witness the grand piano and magnificent choruses at the start of the epic “The Promised Future Aeons”): there may not be a trace of Classical/Symphonic Music (more like film soundtracks), but the songs are so carefully arranged that this album doesn’t even seem released just two years after Enthrone Darkness Triumphant. Silenoz and Astennu (who left the band after this album’s recording) use powerful guitar tones, and on a pair of occasions there’s the occasional Neoclassical guitar scale.In theory, this collection of instrumental duels and strong arrangements should be flawless: instead, it really isn’t. Although at the time the label hadn’t yet reached the relevance of the 00’s, Nuclear Blast’s modus operandi of ultra-clear, ultra-loud production technique (here a bit hampered by the analogic recording) had dictated their way even on Spiritual Black Dimension. The album isn’t bad, but with such a pumped production and overkill of dynamics, it’s hard to choose highlights and even to distinguish melodies and songs. And although if Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth managed to perpetuate successfully the continuation of Emperor’s style, both became also targets of genre fanatics obsessed with “purity” and “underground community”. In other words, those who may feel offended by the exaggerated theatrics of this album will hardly continue on with the band’s discography.Highlights: “Reptile”, “The Promised Future Aeons”, "Arcane Lifeforce Mysteria".