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The Stone Roses - Second Coming album download

Second Coming (The Stone Roses album). Second Coming is the second and to date, most recent studio album by English rock band The Stone Roses, released through Geffen Records on 5 December 1994 in the UK and in early 1995 in the US. It was recorded at Forge Studios in Oswestry, Shropshire and Rockfield Studios near Monmouth in Wales between 1992 and 1994.

Second Coming is a loose, multilayered overproduction that created a genius sound. Ian's vocal,John and Mani funky soul groove, and Reni's jazz training coming into full bloom. As important as any important record before it! Reply Notify me 2 Helpful. for me, the reason second coming gets slated so much, is because it gets constantly compared to, and is measured against, the debut album "the stone roses", when compared to what is, in my book, one of the greatest albums of all time, by any band, it's always gonna fall short. I do believe that if the second coming was made by any other band but the roses, it would be seen as a truly great album rather than the disappointment it is viewed as today. Reply Notify me Helpful.

Second Coming is the second and to date final Stone Roses studio album. It was recorded in Wales between 1992 and 1994. Peculiarly, it has 99 tracks on it with 86 silent tracks each lasting 4 seconds long. Tap and hold to copy URL. Second Coming Tracklist. 1. Breaking Into Heaven Lyrics. How Do you Sleep’ is the eleventh song on The Stone Roses’ second studio ‘Second Coming’.

Second Coming is the second, and to date final, studio album by English rock band The Stone Roses, released through Geffen Records on 5 December 1994 in the UK and in early 1995 in the US. It went platinum in the UK and sold over 1 million copies worldwide and was dedicated to Philip Hall, the band's publicist, who died of cancer in 1993.

Listen free to The Stone Roses – Second Coming (Breaking Into Heaven, Driving South and more). Second Coming is an album released on December 5, 1994 in the UK and early 1995 in the US by The Stone Roses. The album was released on Geffen Records. It went platinum in the UK and sold 1 million copies worldwide. The album was dedicated to Philip Hall, the band's publicist, who died of cancer in 1993.

There's no denying that Second Coming is a bit of a letdown. None of the songs are quite as strong as the best on their debut, but there is plenty of good music on the band's much-delayed second record. The Stone Roses create a dense tapestry of interweaving guitars and pulsing bass grooves. Ian Brown growls a little more than before, but he isn't the center of the music; John Squire's endlessly colorful riffs are. It's clear that Squire has been listening to a bit of hard rock, particularly Led Zeppelin

And that’s The Stone Roses’ second album all over, even with the prospect of being horribly eaten alive, admitting to liking ‘Second Coming’ is still a bit embarrassing. Second Coming’ also delivers three stand out moments worthy of any in The Stone Roses’ impressive cannon. How Do You Sleep’ demonstrates that far from being dismantled, the pop formula was far more versatile then ever, even when reduced to its bare essentials; ‘Ten Storey Love Song’ is just that, a beautiful skyscraper of emotion, while comeback single ‘Love Spreads’ is the Mancs at their take no prisoners best.

The Stone Roses ‘Second Coming’ Re-evaluated. It seems like yesterday. Many of them were already too young to have been there for the band’s first coming- the triumphant baggy rush of 89/90 but here they were waiting for their own piece of history.

Track List

Title/Composer Performer Time
1 Breaking into Heaven John Squire The Stone Roses 11:18
2 Driving South John Squire The Stone Roses 5:09
3 Ten Storey Love Song John Squire The Stone Roses 4:29
4 Daybreak Ian Brown / Gary Mounfield / John Squire / Alan "Reni" Wren The Stone Roses 6:46
5 Your Star Will Shine John Squire The Stone Roses 2:56
6 Straight to the Man Ian Brown The Stone Roses 3:11
7 Begging You Ian Brown / John Squire The Stone Roses 4:54
8 Tightrope John Squire The Stone Roses 4:30
9 Good Times John Squire The Stone Roses 5:38
10 Tears John Squire The Stone Roses 6:53
11 How Do You Sleep John Squire The Stone Roses 4:55
12 Love Spreads John Squire The Stone Roses 5:46
13 [Hidden Track] The Stone Roses 6:26

The Stone Roses - Second Coming album download

Performer: The Stone Roses

Title: Second Coming

Duration: 01:06:25

Style: Alternative Pop/Rock,Alternative/Indie Rock,Britpop,Dance-Rock,British Trad Rock,Dream Pop,Madchester,Post-Grunge

Genre: Rock/Pop

Size MP3: 1811 mb

Size FLAC: 1705 mb

Rating: 4.7 / 5

Votes: 877

Other Formats: VQF VOC TTA AA FLAC APE

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Vojar
The Stone Roses, always an ignorant band despite the flourishes of their music, in 1994 were finished. A legal issue started by their ex-label, Silvertone, was the cause of their ruin: the label, exploiting the band's premature legacy, prevented them to release even a second of music before it could end. When it was, the label pushed the band's sessions for a year, in 1992. Following then a court case, Squire and Brown's fatherhood, deaths of people related to the band, The Stone Roses were left totally empty. Empty of ides, of desire and of passion. They recorded the album in a whole year, they titled it Second Coming and released it at the wrong date of December: by the beginning of 1995, everyone had forgot the previous year's releases. So The Stone Roses, after some live shows, disbanded in 1996.What was left was their last, and ultimately best release yet (apart of a pair of singles 22 years later). Second Coming isn't a hit-the-mark blockbuster hit as their debut album: Second Coming is 66 minutes of jamming, like that Led Zeppelin made so well in the mid 70's during the concerts. It isn't designed to please anyone except the band members: in short, a gift for themselves for Christmas. What a strange choice. A stranger choice than opening the album with an excellent Funk fest called "Breaking into Heaven", their best song ever as of today. Other three Funk numbers follow, namely "Driving South", "Daybreak", the miniature "Straight to the Man" and lead single "Love Spreads": this one betrays a Soundgarden inspiration from their "Hands All Over" (and you said Britpop regretted Grunge).Fairly enough, the cuts that diversify from the previous formula are less effective: "Ten Storey Love Song" may be a love song, but is everything but straight, since it fuses every kind of phasing and reverb to build it up: it's not consistent. Also, the ballads are not particularly interesting (apart of the warm "Tightrope"), and since they are all messed up in the second half of the album they cut prematurely the album's flow, making us losing the interest to listen until "Love Spreads" arrives. Meanwhile, single "Begging You" betrays the Dance panorama on which the band has always been inserted, but since it's the only totally electronic cut here, it doesn't make The Stone Roses a Dance band.They were and are a Rock band at their core, and with this album, they chug along with an iron stomp: some cuts may not be gripping (no matter if "Tears" unapologetically steals its first riff from Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama", but all of them are blessed by the messy mood of the album. Thankfully.Highlights:"Breaking into Heaven", "Driving South", "Begging You", "Love Spreads".
Vojar
The Stone Roses, always an ignorant band despite the flourishes of their music, in 1994 were finished. A legal issue started by their ex-label, Silvertone, was the cause of their ruin: the label, exploiting the band's premature legacy, prevented them to release even a second of music before it could end. When it was, the label pushed the band's sessions for a year, in 1992. Following then a court case, Squire and Brown's fatherhood, deaths of people related to the band, The Stone Roses were left totally empty. Empty of ides, of desire and of passion. They recorded the album in a whole year, they titled it Second Coming and released it at the wrong date of December: by the beginning of 1995, everyone had forgot the previous year's releases. So The Stone Roses, after some live shows, disbanded in 1996.What was left was their last, and ultimately best release yet (apart of a pair of singles 22 years later). Second Coming isn't a hit-the-mark blockbuster hit as their debut album: Second Coming is 66 minutes of jamming, like that Led Zeppelin made so well in the mid 70's during the concerts. It isn't designed to please anyone except the band members: in short, a gift for themselves for Christmas. What a strange choice. A stranger choice than opening the album with an excellent Funk fest called "Breaking into Heaven", their best song ever as of today. Other three Funk numbers follow, namely "Driving South", "Daybreak", the miniature "Straight to the Man" and lead single "Love Spreads": this one betrays a Soundgarden inspiration from their "Hands All Over" (and you said Britpop regretted Grunge).Fairly enough, the cuts that diversify from the previous formula are less effective: "Ten Storey Love Song" may be a love song, but is everything but straight, since it fuses every kind of phasing and reverb to build it up: it's not consistent. Also, the ballads are not particularly interesting (apart of the warm "Tightrope"), and since they are all messed up in the second half of the album they cut prematurely the album's flow, making us losing the interest to listen until "Love Spreads" arrives. Meanwhile, single "Begging You" betrays the Dance panorama on which the band has always been inserted, but since it's the only totally electronic cut here, it doesn't make The Stone Roses a Dance band.They were and are a Rock band at their core, and with this album, they chug along with an iron stomp: some cuts may not be gripping (no matter if "Tears" unapologetically steals its first riff from Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama", but all of them are blessed by the messy mood of the album. Thankfully.Highlights:"Breaking into Heaven", "Driving South", "Begging You", "Love Spreads".
Ffrlel
Second Coming unfairly gets a bad rap amongst listeners and critics alike. While their debut record was a sonic mash of Alt-Rock and indie dance music styled by the then popular music scene in the Roses' hometown of Manchester was a critical smash hit, the follow up which came 5 years later was a much different story. If you were expecting another dance inspired indie record you aren't getting it here. The funky rhythm section is still here and Mani and Reni still do a spectacular job but now the jangly Byrds inspired guitar work of John Squire had morphed into Zeppelin infused savagery. The opening 12 minute track 'Breaking Into Heaven' opens with 4 minutes of tribal drumming and ambient noises like water running before the thundering drums take over and Squire starts soloing while Ian Brown whispers about how you don't need death to find Heaven cause "The kingdom's all inside". The Jimmy Page inspiration continues on the dance-blues track 'Driving South' which features a barreling guitar track and a madchester grove. Things get more like their debut with the next track 'Ten Storey Love Song' being more similar to their debut album. The song smoothly fades into the next song, the funky 'Daybreak' which morphs into a fast freak out with Reni's drums taking center stage. The acoustic campfire style singalong 'Your Star Will Shine' follows and is a pleasant little interlude, being the shortest track on the album. Things get a more southern and groovy with 'Straight to The Man' featuring the Jew's harp and a smooth vocal by Brown. The breakbeat inspired dance number 'Begging You' is next which sounds more like a club song from hell, warped by reverb soaked vocals and jet engine noises of all things before the next 'Tightrope', a joyous singalong acoustic piece again calms things down. The primal blues of 'Good Times' kicks things back up a notch with more face melting riffs by Squire before we reach the height of Zeppelin influence on the album, the half acoustic half rock 'Tears' which features a flamenco style guitar break. The penultimate track 'How Do You Sleep?' Is more Byrds inspired again and features incredibly surreal and often disturbing lyrics ("I Seen your severed head/at a banquet for the dead") before finally Squire cranks up the guitar again and takes us to the beyond and back with 'Love Spreads' featuring more surreal religious lyrics and a blazing riff before things get faster and faster before abruptly ending in a glorious mash of guitar wailing, heavy drums and Brown sneering over the madness. And then, after the silence, an untitled track (Titled 'The Foz' on ITunes) begins. A 6 minute freak out which features Brown playing the Violin and Squire on the mandolin which screeches on, often devolving into noisy howling and the scraping of strings. Second Coming is naturally not as good as their stellar debut but the intense blues jams and soaring Rhythm section make the record
Ffrlel
Second Coming unfairly gets a bad rap amongst listeners and critics alike. While their debut record was a sonic mash of Alt-Rock and indie dance music styled by the then popular music scene in the Roses' hometown of Manchester was a critical smash hit, the follow up which came 5 years later was a much different story. If you were expecting another dance inspired indie record you aren't getting it here. The funky rhythm section is still here and Mani and Reni still do a spectacular job but now the jangly Byrds inspired guitar work of John Squire had morphed into Zeppelin infused savagery. The opening 12 minute track 'Breaking Into Heaven' opens with 4 minutes of tribal drumming and ambient noises like water running before the thundering drums take over and Squire starts soloing while Ian Brown whispers about how you don't need death to find Heaven cause "The kingdom's all inside". The Jimmy Page inspiration continues on the dance-blues track 'Driving South' which features a barreling guitar track and a madchester grove. Things get more like their debut with the next track 'Ten Storey Love Song' being more similar to their debut album. The song smoothly fades into the next song, the funky 'Daybreak' which morphs into a fast freak out with Reni's drums taking center stage. The acoustic campfire style singalong 'Your Star Will Shine' follows and is a pleasant little interlude, being the shortest track on the album. Things get a more southern and groovy with 'Straight to The Man' featuring the Jew's harp and a smooth vocal by Brown. The breakbeat inspired dance number 'Begging You' is next which sounds more like a club song from hell, warped by reverb soaked vocals and jet engine noises of all things before the next 'Tightrope', a joyous singalong acoustic piece again calms things down. The primal blues of 'Good Times' kicks things back up a notch with more face melting riffs by Squire before we reach the height of Zeppelin influence on the album, the half acoustic half rock 'Tears' which features a flamenco style guitar break. The penultimate track 'How Do You Sleep?' Is more Byrds inspired again and features incredibly surreal and often disturbing lyrics ("I Seen your severed head/at a banquet for the dead") before finally Squire cranks up the guitar again and takes us to the beyond and back with 'Love Spreads' featuring more surreal religious lyrics and a blazing riff before things get faster and faster before abruptly ending in a glorious mash of guitar wailing, heavy drums and Brown sneering over the madness. And then, after the silence, an untitled track (Titled 'The Foz' on ITunes) begins. A 6 minute freak out which features Brown playing the Violin and Squire on the mandolin which screeches on, often devolving into noisy howling and the scraping of strings. Second Coming is naturally not as good as their stellar debut but the intense blues jams and soaring Rhythm section make the record